Last edited by Felmaran
Monday, August 3, 2020 | History

3 edition of Population Growth and Agrarian Change found in the catalog.

Population Growth and Agrarian Change

An Historical Perspective (Cambridge Geographical Studies)

by David B. Grigg

  • 122 Want to read
  • 15 Currently reading

Published by Cambridge University Press .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Human geography,
  • History,
  • History: American,
  • USA,
  • Developing countries,
  • Social Science / Human Geography,
  • Economic aspects,
  • Agriculture,
  • Population

  • The Physical Object
    FormatPaperback
    Number of Pages352
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL7735941M
    ISBN 100521296358
    ISBN 109780521296359

    The rise of modernity, with its global reach, massive population and economic growth, and energy revolutions can make these worlds look paltry by comparison, a long, flat-line epoch of stagnant agrarian economies governed by unchanging autocratic states. 2 - Global population growth, food security and food and farming for the future. Email your librarian or administrator to recommend adding this book to your organisation's collection. Achieving Food Security in the Face of Climate Change: Cited by: 5.

    The Conditions of Agricultural Growth: The Economics of Agrarian Change Under Population Pressure: : Boserup, Ester: BooksAuthor: Ester Boserup.   In sharp contrast to widely accepted ideas, she shows how population growth may be the main stimulus to agrarian change. In developing this theme, the author identifies successive stages of agriculture, characterized by differences in techniques of cultivation and in social structure and show how they can be explained by differences in.

    This chapter analyses key hypotheses on the impacts of rural population growth on agriculture, natural resource management, and related impacts on poverty in development countries. It is argued that the impacts of population growth likely to be negative when there is no collective response than when population growth induces infrastructure development, collective action, institutional or Author: John Pender. The conclusion that rapid population growth has slowed development is by no means straightfor-ward or clearcut (see Box ). Under certain condi-tions moderate population growth can be benefi-cial. As Chapter 4 showed, in Europe, Japan, and North America economic growth has been accom-panied by moderate population growth, which.


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Population Growth and Agrarian Change by David B. Grigg Download PDF EPUB FB2

Book Description This book, first published insuggests some ways of looking at the interrelationships between population growth and agrarian change, and uses these approaches to consider the demographic and agrarian problems of various parts of Europe in the past - in the fourteenth century, the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries, and in the early nineteenth by: This book, first published insuggests some ways of looking at the interrelationships between population growth and agrarian change, and uses these.

This book, first published insuggests some ways of looking at the interrelationships between population growth and agrarian change, and uses these approaches to consider the demographic and agrarian problems of various parts of Europe in the past in the fourteenth century, the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries, and in the early nineteenth century.3/5(2).

This book, first published insuggests some ways of looking at the interrelationships between population growth and agrarian change, and uses these approaches to consider the demographic and agrarian problems of various parts of Europe in the past - in the fourteenth century, the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries, and in the early nineteenth century.3/5(2).

The Conditions of Agricultural Growth: The Economics of Agrarian Change Under Population Pressure - Kindle edition by Boserup, Ester.

Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading The Conditions of Agricultural Growth: The Population Growth and Agrarian Change book of Agrarian Change Under Population Pressure/5(3).

Population growth and agrarian change: an historical perspective Item Preview Population growth and agrarian change: an historical perspective by Grigg, David B. Publication date Internet Archive Books. Scanned in China. Uploaded by Tracey Gutierres on Aug SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata) Pages: TY - JOUR.

T1 - David Grigg. Population Growth and Agrarian Change. T2 - An Historical Perspective. AU - Mokyr, Joel. PY - / Y1 - / M3 - Book/Film/Article reviewAuthor: Joel Mokyr. In sharp contrast to widely accepted ideas, she shows how population growth may be the main stimulus to agrarian change.

In developing this theme, the author identifies successive stages of agriculture, characterized by differences in techniques of cultivation and in social structure and show how they can be explained by differences in population density.

Population growth makes urban civilization possible. The second book is highly interesting, and has many insightful passages. Yet it fails to reach the simple elegance of The Conditions of Agricultural Growth — that quality which makes this book really deserving of being added to this list of masterpieces.

This book sets out to investigate the process of agrarian change from new angles and with new results. It starts on firm ground rather than from abstract economic theory.

Upon its initial appearance, it was heralded as "a small masterpiece, which economic historians should read--and not simply quote"--Giovanni Frederico, Economic History Services. Since the s much attention has been paid to the effect of rapid population growth on the rural societies of the Third World.

Yet it is often forgotten that Europe faced similar problems in the past. This book, first published insuggests some ways of looking at the interrelationships Price: $ Get this from a library.

Agrarian change and population growth: an interim report. [International Union for the Scientific Study of Population. Committee on Economics and Demography.]. This book, first published insuggests some ways of looking at the interrelationships between population growth and agrarian change, and uses these approaches to consider the demographic and agrarian problems of various parts of Europe in the past - in the fourteenth century, the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries, and in the early nineteenth century.

Investigating the process of agrarian change, this book analyzes costs and productivity under the main systems of primitive agriculture.

The conclusion is that technical, economic and social. This book sets out to investigate the process of agrarian change from new angles and with new results. It starts on firm ground rather than from abstract economic theory. Upon its initial appearance, it was heralded as "a small masterpiece, which economic historians should read--and not simply quote"--Giovanni Frederico, Economic History by:   This book, first published insuggests some ways of looking at the interrelationships between population growth and agrarian change, and uses these approaches to consider the demographic and agrarian problems of various parts of Europe in the past – in the fourteenth century, the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries, and in the 4/5(1).

The population of China was recorded as around 60 millions in A.D. 2 and slightly more than 1, millions in To feed these millions of people has always been the major task of Chinese agriculture. This paper is attempted to give a brief survey on the relation between agricultural change and population growth in China inFile Size: 2MB.

The growing population pressure and short supply of land has been the main concern for planners and policy makers in developing countries like Nepal. This book examines: (a) the regional and temporal pattern of population growth in Nepal; (b) the regional pattern of land use, output and productivity in agriculture; (c) the relationship between population growth, area, output and productivity in Cited by: 9.

Of all published articles, the following were the most read within the past 12 months. This book sets out to investigate the process of agrarian change from new angles and with new results.

It starts on firm ground rather than from abstract economic theory.4/5. The question of population growth looms large in the future of Africa. the editors of Population Growth and Agricultural Change in Africa observe in their introductory chapter that the estimated population of million people in will double by the year This increase will take place within a context of decreasing per capita food production over the last several decades.Thinking about population as a driver of agricultural development provides insights into induced technical and institutional change, whether it be Esther Boserup's declining fallow period, modern.Ester Boserup (18 May – 24 September ) was a Danish studied economic and agricultural development, worked at the United Nations as well as other international organizations, and wrote seminal books on agrarian change and the role of women in development.

Boserup is known for her theory of agricultural intensification, also known as Boserup's theory, which posits that Born: Ester Børgesen, 18 MayCopenhagen.